Pellet Hops

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Current Inventory: 16


All hops are packaged in oxygen, light and moisture barrier bags. They are purged with nitrogen and stored cold to optimize freshness. Resealable packages feature a tear notch and zipper.  Different varieties and package sizes available.

  • Amarillo® - Amarillo® hops have become super popular with microbrewers. Brewers are describing the flavor and aroma as a supercharged version of Cascade. Floral, tropical, and citrus (lemon, orange and grapefruit) characteristics. However, it has a distinctive Orange character to it that is very different from Cascade. Supply has been very limited the last few years so make sure to buy some while it is available. 
  • Azacca® - Azacca® is a new hip hop that has aromas of tropical fruits and citrus. Tasting notes of spicy mango, pineapple, tangerine and pine. An excellent dual purpose hop due to its 14-16% AA range. Great for single hop beers, pale ales, IPAs and anything else you want to toss it into.  
  • Bravo® - Bravo® is an excellent bittering hop that has become popular with American craft brewers. Known for a floral, fruity, and slightly spicy aroma. The high alpha (14%-17%AA) bitterness is balanced by a smooth finish. Try Bravo™ in Pale Ales, IPAs, Stouts or even Barley Wines.
  • Cascade - The popular Cascade hop was first developed by the U.S.D.A. around 1972 in Oregon and has given life to the same varietal from other regions such as New Zealand and Argentina. All Cascade hops have the same essential traits but are influenced by the region they are grown in. Dual purpose applications and wide accessibility makes the Cascade hop the most commonly used varietal in home and commercial craft brews. 
  • Cashmere - Originally released in 2013, Cashmere was developed by Washington State University as a cross between Cascade and Northern Brewer. With a higher alpha acid content than Cascade, this dual-purpose hop has a smooth bitterness, but really shines as a late addition hop when used at knock out, whirlpool, or dry hopping. Expect an herbal, slightly spicy aroma with notes of lemon, lime, melon and stone fruit.
  • Centennial - Centennial hops were first developed back in 1974 from a predominant Brewer’s Gold hop mixed with Fuggle and East Kent Golding, among others. The result was a balanced aromatic and bittering hop which was released in 1990. Sometimes referred to as a Super Cascade, the Centennial hop offers a more citrus heavy aroma and taste that blends perfectly into IPAs, Pale Ales, or Bitters. 
  • Columbus CTZ - This dual purpose hop is a high alpha varietal with a neutral bitterness and intense aroma. Floral and citrus notes come out in both aroma and flavor, but can be very pungent, which makes Columbus great for late additions to a boil or dry-hopping. Columbus is a perfect choice for IPAs, Pale and Imperial Ales. Also referred to as Tomahawk, Zeus, or CTZ. 
  • Chinook - Chinook hops are a very distinctive dual-purpose hop used in Ales for both bittering and flavor/aroma. Chinook hops are commonly used in IPA's. Distinct, medium intensity spice and pine characteristics with subtle notes of grapefruit. Some consider the bittering quality of this hop is a bit rough because it lingers in your mouth after swallowing. However, some brewers can't get enough. The flavor/aroma is spicy and unique, with a huge following of loyal fans.
  • Citra® - Citra® is currently one of the most sought after hops among craft and home brewers for their intense citrus aroma and flavor. Grapefruit and lime aromas along with gooseberry, passion fruit, and lychee notes. Currently one of the top choices for late hop additions or dry hopping when you want to make that ultimate hop bomb IPA or Pale Ale. Citra® also has a fairly high alpha acid content making it a good choice for bittering IPAs, Pales, and American Ales.
  • Falconer's Flight - This varietal is exclusive to Hop Union and was developed in honor of American Northwest brewing legend Glen Hay Falconer and released in 2010. Falconer’s Flight serves as a dual purpose brewing ingredient, imparting both a bittering quality and fruity aromatics to regional styles like Northwest style IPAs and Pale Ales. Falconer’s Flight will generally have an alpha acid range from about 9% to 12%. If used as a flavor and aroma hop, your brew will also benefit from the light citrus, grapefruit, and tropical fruit flavors.
  • Fuggles - This popular hop runs the gamut in global varietals from U.S. to U.K. and even more variations therein. Though the region hops are grown in will undoubtedly affect the characteristics that come through in your brew, Fuggle hops tend to assume the same general properties across the board. Introduced way back in 1875, Fuggles has been one of the most popular British hops used since! Now available and grown across the globe, Fuggles are used to complement a variety of beer styles to suit their region. They work well for both bittering and aromatics in Belgian and English Ales as well as Red Ales and IPAs.  Fuggle hops will normally have a lower alpha acid level, generally between 3% and 7%.  The aromatics tend to be earthy, with hints of grass, wood and mint.
  • Galaxy - Australian developed Galaxy hops are sought after for their intensely aromatic characteristics. Bred from an Aussie high alpha female and Perle male, the result is a wonderfully bright, citrus forward flavor and aroma.  Galaxy has a slightly higher alpha acid range between 13% and 15%,but the most common use is as a late addition or in dry hopping, which lends the fullest pungent citrus and tropical passion fruit flavors to a brew. 
  • German Tradition/Hallertauer -Also known as Hallertauer, German Tradition, or Traditional, these hops were bred from a cross of Hallertauer Mittelfruh, Gold, and Saaz at the Hull Hop Institute and registered in 1993. Used primarily as an aromatic hop in brews, Tradition also imparts a crisp bite of flavor from its unique lineage. 
    Tradition hops generally have an alpha acid range of about 5% to 7%, and can offer a pleasing balance of bitterness and crisp floral, herbal aromas in brews like German Ales, Pilsners, and Hefeweizens.
  • Goldings (US) - One of the most traditional English varietals, Golding hops hail from a lineage of East Kent Goldings. Having been produced in the U.K. for over 200 years, Goldings have also become popular amongst American brewers for several decades. A unique aroma of mild sweetness and light floral let this hop lend a pleasing flavor to lighter styles of beer. With an alpha acid range of about 4% to 7%, Goldings tend to be used only for their aromatic characteristics. Try this classic varietal in styles like ESB, Brown Ales, and Porters.
  • Goldings (British) - Universally the first choice for an aroma hop in English Ales. Smooth and delicate with floral, lavender, spice, honey, earth, lemon and thyme overtones. While most hops stand out against the malt, this unusual hop actually blends in and complements the malt flavors. You truly cannot add too much at the end of a boil as an aroma/flavor hop. Often referred to as Kent Goldings, British Kent Goldings, BKG, or East Kent Goldings. The ideal hop for making English ales, bitters, and pale ales.
  • HBC 342 (Experimental Hops) - Hop Union and the Hop Breeding Co. introduced this experimental American hop in 2012. So far it has garnered rave reviews from home and craft brewers alike. Bred for its high alpha and pleasing aroma, this dual purpose hop works well in a variety of beer styles. With an alpha acid content between 11% and 14%, HBC 342 offers a wonderful bittering quality in beers like IPAs, Pales, and Brown Ales. The mild citrus, tropical, and melon fruit aromas help to make this experimental hop even more versatile.
  • Helga - This Australian bred hop has a decidedly German character from parent varietal Hallertauer Mittelfruh. Helga was a product of open pollination of a Hallertauer Mittelfruh female, and was formerly known as Southern Hallertau. After its commercial release in the late 1980s, Helga began gaining popularity among craft brewers in the late 1990s for its versatility as a dual purpose ingredient.  With an alpha acid range of just 5% to 7.5%, the bittering quality is not strong, but apparent in beers like Belgian and American Ales. A delicate floral, herbaceous aroma carries a bit of spice for a depth that works well in darker Lagers.
  • Lemondrop™ - The name truly says it all. Lemondrop™  offers a "unique lemon-citrus character with a pleasant aroma." The bright citrus and subtle herbaceous notes are perfect for sessionable beers. While ales tend to bring out her sweeter side, Lemondrop™  is delicate and refined enough for quality lagers. 5%-7% typical Alpha Acid content.
  • Liberty - This American hop is the result of breeding German Hallertau Mittelfruh hops with a USDA male and released in 1991. Best utilized as an aroma hop, Liberty imparts a spicy, citrus lemon scent and flavor into just about any Lager. Liberty tends to work well in Pilsner, Bock, and Kolsh styles due to its German roots. With an alpha acid content of just 3% to 5%, Liberty is rarely used as a bittering hop.
  • Magnum - A cross between Galena and a German male hop, Magnum hops are available in both German and U.S. grown varieties. The German varietal is known as Hallertau Magnum, so it’s generally clear where your hops came from. Primarily used as a bittering hop, Magnum has only a mild, herbal, piney and resinous aroma typical of high alpha varietals. The alpha acid range of 10% to 14% provides perfect bittering in beer styles like IPAs, Pale Ales, and even Stouts. This clean bittering agent is what makes Magnum hops so popular.
  • Mosaic® - A product of Nugget and Simcoe® hops, American bred Mosaic® hops are one of the most in-demand aroma hops on the market. Released in 2012 by the Hop Breeding Company, Mosiac® presents a complex bouquet of earthy, pine, and fruit aromas from berry to mango. Though Mosiac® does contain an alpha acid range between 11.5% and 13.5%, it is generally not used for bittering. The overall characteristics of Mosiac® hops make for a lovely addition in just about any beer style, though most commonly used in pale ales, IPAs, and stouts.
  • Mt Hood - This American aroma hop is a triploid seedling of Hallertau Mittelfruh and half sister to Ultra, Liberty and Crystal hops, released in Oregon in 1989. This lineage creates a wonderfully aromatic combination of mild herbs and floral with a hint of citrus.  An alpha acid range of 4% to 8% lets the mild flavors and aromas come through in beer styles like English ales, bocks, and even stouts.  
  • Nelson Sauvin - This cross between New Zealand Smoothcone and wild hops makes for a versatile brewing ingredient. A high alpha and distinctly fruity aroma make Nelson Sauvin hops totally unique. A bright aroma of gooseberry, grapefruit and citrus pack a punch in beer styles like APAs, IPAs, and even some lagers. The alpha acid range of 12% to 13% offers a great bittering quality that is balanced by the intense fruitiness.
  • Northern Brewer - This traditional German bittering hop was first bred at Wye College from a cross between Brewer’s Gold and Canterbury Golding. Released in the 1940s, this varietal is now available in regional spin-offs, including a very similar U.S. grown Northern Brewer. It is currently used as a true dual purpose hop, offering both well-rounded bitterness and a full, woodsy aroma of pine, herbs and mint. The alpha acid range is generally between 8% to 10%, and can be used to bitter most ales as well as some lagers.
  • Nugget -Bred from Brewer’s Gold and a high alpha male, this American Hop was released in 1982 and has become increasingly popular. Though Nugget was first believed to be only a bittering hop, it is now generally accepted as a dual purpose brewing ingredient. This is due to Nugget’s very pleasant aroma of spice, herbs and soft notes of peach and pear that come through due to high oil levels in the hop. An alpha acid range from about 12% to 14.5% allows for a strong bittering quality that shines in brews like IPAs, barley wines, and ESBs.
  • Saaz - One of the Noble hops that orginated near the town of Saaz in the Czech Republic and is now grown around the world. Whether American, Australian, or European in origin, the Saaz hop is one of the most popular and replicated varietals in the world. Saaz was originally used as an aromatic hop famous for European lagers. It has been found that in popular styles like Belgian Ales, Light Lagers and Pilsners, Saaz can be used for its soft bittering quality as well.  Has an alpha acid range of about 3% to 5%. Prized for its classic herbal, earthy, and spicy aroma.
  • Sabro® - Sabro™ brand HBC 438 is the newest aroma hop release from the Hop Breeding Company. Sabro is notable for its complexity of fruity and citrus flavors. It imparts distinct tangerine, coconut, tropical fruit, and stone fruit aromas, with hints of cedar, mint, and cream. Sabro’s pedigree is the result of a unique cross pollination of a female neomexicanus hop. With a robust brewing performance, Sabro proves to be a strongly expressive hop that translates its flavor incredibly well into beer.
  • Simcoe® - From Yakima Chief Ranches in Washington comes another home-brewer favorite, the Simcoe® hop. While its parentage is unknown, Simcoe® is often compared to Cascade for its light aroma and dual purpose uses in brewing. An alpha acid range from 12% to 14% combined with a rich aroma of earthy pine and citrus makes Simcoe® a well-rounded addition to just about any style of beer.
  • Strata - An IPA/Session-IPA/Pale Ale hop (and believe it or don’t, lager hop) with many layers of different fruit flavor, dried and fresh, anchored with a dried chili-cannabis-funk that does not have any diesel, machine oil, or catty ‘baggage’. Late hot side additions bring out layers of rounded-tropical plus bright-fresh fruit flavors; dry hopping yields more grapefruit and cannabis. Nice with roasted malts too.
  • Tettnanger - Sometimes referred to as Tettnang, Schwetzinger, or Deutscher Frühopfen, Tettnanger hops are a natural land race originating in the Tettnang region of Germany. A traditional noble hop, Tettnanger has been crossed with Fuggles and re-grown in a variety of regions around the world including the U.S., Australia, and Switzerland. While these Tettnanger hops go by the same name and offer the same applications in brewing, you will get a slightly different aroma and higher bittering potential due to the cross with Fuggles. With German Tettnanger hops, expect that spicy aroma with hints of floral, earthy goodness. Tettnanger has a slightly lower alpha acid range of about 3% to 6% and makes for a perfect addition to German Ales, Lagers, and Wheat Beers. Santiam hops, Spault, and Fuggles are good substitutes for Tettnanger hops if needed.
  • Warrior®- Though its true lineage is kept under wraps by Yakima Chief Ranches in Washington, Warrior® hops exhibit similar characteristics to Nugget and Columbus hops. This makes Warrior® a high alpha bittering hop, with mild aromatic notes of resin, citrus, and herbs. 
  • Willamette- A triploid seedling of the English Fuggle variety, Willamette is the most widely grown hop in the U.S., originally released from the USDA Breeding Program in 1976. Somewhere between English and American, the aroma of Willamette hops is its main application in brewing. Slightly spicy with floral and fruity notes, Willamette can be utilized in just about any beer style, but is commonly used in English Ales, Golden Ales, and Brown Ales.